Address:
3011 S. 25th Street
Fargo, ND 58103

Phone:
1 701 237 9211

Ametrine


A dynamic example of blending colors, Ametrine is nature’s balance of Amethyst and Citrine.

Its purple and yellow hues, normally found on opposite sides of the color wheel, offer a visually arresting combination. Such combinations make Ametrine a winning fashion accessory as it complements apparel year-round. Ametrine gemstones were first seen by Europeans in the 17th century when they were presented as a gift to the Spanish queen by a conquistador returning from South America. Having married the beautiful princess Anahí, from the Ayoreos tribe of Bolivia, the conquistador had received an Ametrine mine as part of his wife’s dowry. Today, the Anahí mine is the world’s only source for this rare gem. Ametrine is typically cut in rectangular shapes to best show their color graduations. They are also a favorite of gem carvers whose expertise brings out the beauty of natures balancing act. As a member of the Quartz family of gems, Ametrine is said to be a good gem for everyday wear, making it an ideal gem for those who seek a unique display of color.

Care

Ametrine is rated “good” for everyday wear. Avoid direct sunlight and exposure to heat which may cause color to fade. To clean, gently scrub with a soft toothbrush and a solution of mild dish soap and warm water, or clean in an at-home ultrasonic unit.

Properties & Reactions

Enhancement Code

N

Hardness

7

Color

Purple, Yellow

Species

Quartz

RI

1.544-1.553

Specific Gravity

2.66

Optic Character

DR

Phenomena

None

Ultrasonic

Usually safe

Steamer

Risky

Heat

Fair - color change may occur with heat

Chemicals

Hydrofluoric acid, ammonium fluoride

 

 


 

 

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Ametrine